THE GERMANS ATTACK!

Eugen Zintgraff described how he was received in Kom on his arrival there from ACHAIN in 1889:

He was "suddenly surrounded by warriors who were only pacified with difficulty with the help of the old man. It seemed that the chief was piqued that Zintgraff had not asked permission to enter and wanted to see him. The BeKom seemed very excitable. The war party was led by four young men, princes perhaps, with war-shirts, feather-caps, decorated powder-horns, spears and dane-guns".

It seems that Kom "had no further contacts with the Germans until December 1901 when patrols, engaged in a punitive attack on its neighbour and rival BAFUT, crossed its border and accepted the submission of two Kom tributary chiefs, those of MEJUNG and MEJANG, erroneously believed to be BAFUT vassals".

Another expedition mounted by the Germans in 1904/5 met strong resistance from Kom. This resistance continued for 7 months. The mountainous nature of the area offered a good protection against the German onslaught. Besides, Yu who had revitalised all military clubs during a greater part of his reign was now seasoned to resist the German offensive. When the war became tough, as the Germans entered the villages, burning them down, Foyn Yu left LAIKOM and took refuge
in a forest called AKU-A-NKWAIN.

He remained there as his army struggled to keep the Germans out of his kingdom. According to local accounts, the Germans decided to make peace with Yu since Yu was not prepared to lay down arms. With the conclusion of a peace pact, the Germans formally brought the area under their administration. The German punitive expedition which began in 1904, did not end until January-February 1905 when Kom was reported to be under military occupation.

THE DEATH OF FOYN YU

In 1912 Foyn Yu died after having enlarged Kom to what it is today through his military leadership.
The death of Yu left the throne to the heir-apparent, NGAM.

FOYN NGAM

He is described as a "stubborn figure ... with undoubted will-power and governs his people with a firm hand".

As heir-apparent, Ngam occupied the village headship of FULI and acted also as Yu's "deputy in the NGGVIN-KIJEM sector, in so far as cases were referred to him for judgement which could not be settled at the village level".

THE REVOLT OF THE THREE PRINCES

Early in his reign, a serious dispute between himself and three princes of the blood [KINI-NENGSHIA, AKONI-NENGSHIA AND AYA'A-NKWAIN] broke out. These three won the sympathy of some wives and sons of Foyn Yu and stood up for their cause. It is difficult to determine the reasons for the quarrel given the conflicting accounts.

Some say that Ngam had earned the enmity of these princes while he was heir-apparent at FULI and when Ngam became king, they refused to give him their recognition.

Others say that Ngam had abolished the practice which usually permitted senior princes of the blood to marry widows of a deceased king. This action infuriated KINI, AKONI and AYA'A-NKWAIN who were interested in Yu's widows.

Another version has it that KINI, AKONI and AYA'A, had preferred in the place of Ngam, AYA'A NGWE, the person on whom Foyn Yu "had bestowed many privileges" and whom he hoped "would succeed to kingship".

NAKOM NAYA INTERVENES

Foyn Ngam's action to discipline these princes was greatly deplored by NAKOM NAYA, the-then ruling Queen-Mother [NAFOYN]. She was the sister of Yu, and Ngam's mother's sister. She tried to intervene in the dispute but failed.

Ngam accused them of treason along with some sons of Yu, namely AYA'A-NASA, TUFOYN, NDONGYUI, NKWAIN KUYU and NKWAIN CHI. These were arrested by German soldiers and taken to the MILITARY STATION at BAMENDA where attemps at a reconciliation also failed. They latter escaped while acting as carriers to German patrols on trek. Most of them were recaptured. AKONI escaped to Nigeria. KINI and AYA'A-NKWAIN as well as some sons of Foyn Yu were executed
by the Germans.

NAKOM ON SELF-EXILE

The news of their execution led to suicides committed by some widows of Yu who it seems, were in the dissident group. NAKOM NAYA, in order to manifest her disapproval of Ngam's action, went into self-exile, which took her to KIJEM-KEKU, BABUNGO, NKWEN and BAMESSING. In her large contingent of followers were:
RUDOLPH CHA,
JAMES YIBAIN,
PHILIP FOINTAMA, all princes of the blood, as well as
JINABO II, who became the twelfth ruler.

When NAYA fell sick while in exile, she returned to Kom where she died and was first buried at Njinikom and later at Kikfuni.

FOYN NDI

When Foyn Ngam died in 1926, NDI moved from Fuli and became king. He left behind his dedicated slave, CHIA FEL, as his deputy in the southern sector.

He set out to bring the dissident subjects at NJINIKOM under his control. He negotiated the removal of NAKOM NAYA's remains with FR. MORAN, a missionary, from Njinikom to KIKFUNI. This removal and reburial met strong opposition from Jinabo II [later became king], who like NAYA had accepted the Catholic faith.

Foyn Ndi in order to keep his kingdom more united had to follow a very moderate policy. He himself had been exiled to BALI, and made attempts to avoid any actions that would lead to any estrangements amont his own close relatives. His 26 year of reign ended in 1954 when his death left the throne to LO'O-NENGSHIA, the brother of KINI and AKONI, the dissidents charged with treason by Foyn Ngam.

FOYN LO'O

Foyn LO'O's reign was marked by the WOMEN'S UPRISING in 1958 which has remained a nightmare ever afterwards.

NSON NGWE who died in 1974 [15th December] leaving behind the throne to JINABO II, had succeeded LO'O-NENGSHIA in 1966.

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