Wa yisi ma?

The New York Metropolitan Museum of Art
Heroic Africans - Legendary Leaders, Iconic Sculptures
September 21, 2011–January 29, 2012

I am not sure that Kom citizens are aware of this (now ended) event
which placed Kom at an important level in the cultural map of Africa.

When we say every M+kohmangoh can walk tall and beat their chest anyway
they want, that is because our ancestors left us with (not gold/silver)
but with art, intelligence and the creative ability to keep Kom ahead
of the curve of Afro-culture in the global space.
This might sound like a whole lot of noise-making until we educate ourselves
and the next generations of KOMrades on the value of art and its appreciation
in the same global space we are talking about.
Then the question becomes: so we know how important Kom and its art is to the
world. Now what? How can we use this to ... make money?
Great question.

The answer is:

Leverage.
What?
Yes ... leverage.
That is how money is 'manufactured'.

Leverage?
What is leverage?
Mmh! Where do I start?

For students of Economics, it should be easy to understand.
For the MOTS (Wo/Man on the Street), we will need to think of some parables.
Next time.

Meanwhile here is the link to the event which took place at
The New York Metropolitan Museum of Art
Heroic Africans - Legendary Leaders, Iconic Sculptures
September 21, 2011–January 29, 2012

http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2011/heroic%20africans%20legendary%20leaders%20iconic%20sculptures

 And an excerpt of what was written about artwork from Kom Kingdom:

 "Two of the most striking pieces in the collection are the ceremonial thrones of Chief Tufoyn and Queen Mother Naya, who ruled the Kom grassland kingdom in Cameroon during the mid-19th century. "You get a sense of them both as a living presence," says LaGamma, pointing out the copper hammered around the 6-foot wooden figures to give their skin a lifelike sheen, as well as the real human hair and beadwork added to the memorial throne of Tufoyn's father, Chief Nkwain and his female counterpart, assumed to be Queen Mother Nindum.

 These thrones were never sat upon, but instead were essential for Kom leaders to establish legitimacy, similar to a modern-day will or ceremonial heirloom. "This is the first time these four pieces have been brought together since they left Kom," says LaGamma. "Two generations of Kom leaders are side by side once again.""

iBois+

~wv

 

Add comment


Security code
Refresh