Asɨ aŋ’lì Itaŋikom (The Kom alphabet)

Letter

Awo Itaŋikom

Meaning in English

capital

small

A

a

Abas, achɨ, afo, atam, atef, ayes

Lizard, stool, thing, trap, will, broom

Æ

æ

kU, bU, fɨkæ,

Four, dad, wall framework,

B

b

Ba, bò, bes, bɨsɨ, bɨyn, byem

Friend, bag, cat, reserve, dance, hunt

Ch

ch

Chu, cham, chuf, chwokù, chyesɨ, chya

Pound, chew, curve, rat, erase, kick

D

d

dæsɨ, dùyn, dyal, dàla,

Dash, buttocks, pride, traditional gown

E

e

Tem, ncheŋ, nge, ntè’, ngèsɨ

Clear bush, bottle, trouble, village, egussi

F

f

fɨkâ’, fɨkɨ,fɨngvaŋ, fu, fyef, fyeŋ

Tree, mortar, salt, give, blow, divination

G

g

Gèli, gàmtì , gwò, gvà, gyasɨ

Carry on head, help, share, grind, voices

Gh

gh

Ghelɨ, ghaynɨ, ghal

People, stroll, grip

I

i

Ibi, ibayn, ibemsɨ, iboysɨ, ichɨli

Kola nut, light, praises, blessing, bravery

ɨ

†kœ, ɨkwo, ɨk*, ɨlû , ɨlvɨ,

Arm, money, ladder, honey, time

J

j

Jva, jèŋ, jèla, jɨŋ i,

River, hunger, walk, confused

K

k

Kâf, kfaŋ, kumtɨ, kɨŋtɨ, kam

Armpit, modern, knock, shift a bit, squeeze

L

l

labsɨ, layn, lema, le ŋ, libɨs

Decorate , today, grow , beat, tomorrow

M

m

Mbam, mbaŋi, mbas, mbàs, mbayn, mbè

Snake, line, charm, soup, nail, shoulder

N

n

Nìni, ndàbà’, ndoŋ, ndòŋ, ndzɨsɨ, ngvɨm

Old woman, tobacco, flute, potato, dress, python

Ny

ny

Nyam, nyɨmlɨ, nyoŋ, nyɨŋ, nyaŋ, nyàmàbo

Animal, smile, suck, run, snub, leopard

ô

ŋ

ôàŋlɨ, ŋasɨ, ŋotɨ, ŋgutɨ, ŋòŋsɨ

Crawl, open, economise, squat, scare

O

o

Ndo, nò’, ntòyn, itof, isom, isoŋ

House, one, put, intellect, palm tree, tooth

Œ

œ

ɨkœ, asœ,sœ,awœ,

Arm, inner bamboo, deep, ice

S

s

Asaŋ, sami, samo’, sæ, suyn, syɨŋ

Corn, disappear, truth, gain, friend, rush

T

t

Tas, tebtɨ, tɨfwo, toŋ, tum, tuynsɨ

Sew, advise, beads, blow, put, deny

U

u

Ntum, ntufa, lum, wul, kul, ŋɨŋtu

Message, six, bite, person, tie, night

Ue

ue

Akue, azue, azûe, ŋɨŋchûe

Belt, nose, breath, day

V

v

ɨvɨs, visi, vɨytɨ, gvi,

Fire, allow, wait a moment, come

W

w

Wayn, wam, weyn, wusa, wutɨ

Child, lie, ignore, pause, deficient

Y

y

Yangîs, ye’i, yel, yèli, yèma, yu’sɨ

Head tie, learn, plant, wake up, sweat

Z

z

Zɨ gvi, zɨ ndu, zuelɨ

Come in, get in, break into pieces

Source: Nchɨyntɨìbà’lɨ Itaŋikom

My personal favorite among Kom proverbs is one that Gil Schneider put on
his Kom note cards years ago -- Don't insult the crocodile until after
you've crossed the river -- but I have no translation for it and no idea
about its genesis or where he collected it. I asked George Mbeh about it
and he noted that he doesn't know the Kom word for crocodile. Any
thoughts from anyone? has anyone ever heard a Kom person say this? Best,
Eugenia Shanklin
Professor, Anthropology

There was a time, recently when I sent you a loaf of fufu corn through “Mukube”, David Chiatoh, Lord Mayor of Njinikom Rural Council. The mouths of some people watered, although I forbade this, and they wished they were back at home in Kom to partake of that nice cake.

However, the occasion was the bringing up from the dust of Bobe Stephen Tosah, alias Ago Try of Njinikom, into ‘manhood’, the acquisition of his traditional land title, and all the rights that go with becoming more than a “Kom anchi” - (a Kom simpleton). Before then, Ankiambom had sought for an answer from this forum as to how to “count uyuo” He had asked us, how do the Kom people “count uyuo”?

“tang uyuo” He was not the first. We had had the same question asked several times before, and I remember that Nawain Vivian Toh even told us how women do theirs. All of our answers at that time remained kind of incomplete or did not properly fulfill the wishes of those who were begging for answers to the questions posed.

I may be mistaken seriously if that was done, and should that be the case, just bear with my shortcomings.

I decided to go a little deeper into this aspect of Kom life and this is what I found, again, with the load of literature we post these days, I will try to be as brief as I can and sure that some of us will come in to fill the blank spaces. Should there be any questions, I may know the answers to some and trust that some will be answered by others in the forum.

Last Saturday, September 4th, 2010, AFOaKOM@YahooGroups Forum quietly turned 10. In human years that is not even equivalent to a Primary School Graduate. So no big deal and no fanfare but, it might be worthwhile to mention the fact that for a decade, WoinKom (KOMrades) have had an opportunity to connect with each other from the four corners of the world on a platform that 2 decades ago (1990) was only accessible to a handful of so-called computer geeks. How times have changed!

I will leave reflections on the past 10 years to each KOMrade, but will also not fail to give a silent Ayongnii to the many KOMrades who in various ways have made it worthwhile to keep the forum sane and still running. Membership recently clocked at 1000+ and it might take a thesis project to begin to measure the positive, negative or neutral effects of having  this kind of virtual ndo-nchintii within a tribal community that the so-called effect of globalization has forced to spread out to foreign lands while keeping a watchful  eye on where the heart is ... Home = Kom.

There are several aspects on this topic that one can comment on, but I want to resist the temptation of hugging the microphone in this case.

So, over to you all.

iBoisii
~wv

This is an article authored by Bobe Nico Nkfum
Date: Wed Feb 7, 2007 11:25 am
Subject: +youh-Kom WHAT IS +YOUH-KOM?

+youh-kom is a social uplift in kom land and not a social rite as some people think. It is performed when some body has build his house or has succeeded one, at first it was performed only when you must have build at least two houses in your court yard. +youh kom is not succeed-able meaning that a father or uncle who performed the act and dies his successor shall not be considered as a (Gang +youh).

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